Since the release of All the Broken Pieces early in May, I’ve contacted a whole bunch of review sites requesting a review for the book. The way it works, generally, is that each site has a group of regular reviewers. When an author requests a review, the details are sent out to the reviewers and if anyone is interested in reading the book they put their virtual hand out and grab a copy. The review that’s written is based on that individual’s honest opinion of the book. So far, two review sites have reviewed All the Broken Pieces.

Review Number One: 3 out of 5 stars
The reviewer didn’t hate the book, but she didn’t love it either. She said it was ‘a decent read’ but that some parts were ‘drawn out.’ My reaction? Gutted. No body likes hearing that a book they’ve put their heart and tears into got a ‘meh’ reaction from a reader. And when that reaction is shared on a major review site? Ouch! No, I don’t hate the reviewer. My book simply didn’t match her reading preferences. She’s not part of my tribe.

Review Number Two: 5 out of 5 stars
This reviewer loved the book and described it as a ‘poignant exploration of love and pain and all the bits in between.’ She went into detail about all that was right with the book and how much she enjoyed it. My reaction? After sitting in terror of another poor review, this one made me cry happy tears. This reviewer is part of my tribe.

What did I learn from this process? Even among avid romance readers, there are people who will not enjoy my books. But that’s okay, because when I sit down at my desk every day I’m not writing for them. I’m writing for the people who connect with everything I’m trying to say through my storytelling. I’m writing for the people who fall in love with my characters and laugh at my jokes and give tissue warnings to future readers.

I’m writing for my tribe.

I’m writing for you.

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